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You know I love, love LOVE using up leftover yarn to make something awesome. That was the plan with these striped socks I made for Joey.

I wanted to use two self-striping, faux-isle type yarns striped together. I figured that as the colours and patterns changed within each yarn I’d get some pretty interesting stripes. Here are the two colours I used, knit up as plain socks.

First toe up sock!

Fortissima Colori Socka Colour in 9095.

Joey Socks

Opal Rainforest in colour 4007.

I used my own A Study in Scraps pattern, with just a couple of changes. I did two row stripes instead of single row, just because I could. And I added a third colour for the cuffs, heels and toes (Lion Brand Sock Ease in Taffy) because I wasn’t sure if I’d have enough yarn to finish the socks otherwise. Plus I thought it would make a good contrast.

Here are the results!

Joey's scrap socks

I really love them, and they were so fun to knit up! If you are entertained when knitting a self-striping yarn, think how entertained you’ll be using TWO of them!

As I went I weighed my yarn, so next time I wanted to make scrappy socks I’d know if I had enough. If you want to make your own scrap socks, there are a couple of things to keep in mind:
1) My yarns were all fairly thin. You might want to check my weight/yard to your own yarn and calculate accordingly. Or do what I would and just add on a few grams for comfort.
2) Joey wears a size 8.5 men’s shoe. (yeah, that’s pretty small, insert joke here.) I cast on 68 sts for him with a gauge of 8 sts/inch. Bigger socks obviously require more yarn.
3) The cuff of each sock is 2.5 cm/1″ long. The leg length is 11cm/4.3″. Foot length is 19cm/7.5″ measured from the back of the heel when laid flat. If you are making longer/shorter socks plan accordingly!
4) I used a standard heel flap and flat toe.

Here’s what I started with:
Lion Brand (blue): 28 gr
Fortissima (blue stripe): 34 gr
Opal (orange stripe): 32 gr

Here are the amounts used for each part of the sock. Amounts are for ONE sock:

sock amt 2

Total amounts used:

Lion Brand: 11.5 grams (cuff, heel, toe)

Fortissima: 11.0 grams (leg, foot)

Opal: 12.0 grams (leg, foot)

Total yarn used for ONE sock: 34.5 grams.

(If that chart is too small for you click HERE for a bigger version)

I don’t know abut you, but I was a little surprised by how little yarn you need to knit each bit. 4 grams for a toe is not a lot of yarn, y’know?  So you can really get out the small balls of leftovers and still do something cool with them! Let me know if you conduct a similar sock knitting experiment – did you like the results? Did you use a lot more yarn than me? If you want to give me specific amounts for a specific size I’ll post them here for others to use too!



Accessoregatta Socks

Originally uploaded by heatheratjoeyshouse

Sock round up

It seems I have some knitting catch up to do here on the blog!
Guess what I’ve been making? Heh.

I showed you the beginning of a sock back in… oops… March:

Sock WIP

Which finished up look like this:

Spice man

These were toe-up socks for Joey using the Spice Man pattern. Just a plain foot and ribbed cuff, but what else are you going to do with that crazy yarn! It’s a good easy pattern if you’re looking to give toe-up socks a try I’d recommend it. The yarn is Lang Yand Jawoll Color Aktion, colour 132.0289. (Do you think they have 131 other striped yarns?) Not super soft, but very sturdy and very machine washable.

I got into the gift knitting spirit too. I often knit for Christmas and fall birthdays during the summer. I know some of you are cringing at the mere thought of winter holidays, and likely think I’m nuts, BUT! when I open that drawer in December that has all the accumulated knit presents in it? Don’t I feel awesome! Oh look, a whole whack of presents that just need wrapped! HA!

First up, socks for my mom!

Old Joe for Mom

This is the Old Joe pattern, knit in Indigodragonfly Merino Sock, colour West Side Story 2: Jumping the Shark. They are a very mom blue, I think she’ll like them. And if you like a sock with an easy to remember pattern that results in some nice texture then this is the pattern for you. Just knits and purls, not much counting; looks spiffy in the end.

Next, socks for Brenda. Brenda often asks for really crazy coloured socks, but as I was working on these I couldn’t help but think that they looked like something she would pick. That’s how it goes sometimes, right? Check out the awesome cables.

So many cables!

There are more on the leg too, little knots that drip around the leg as you knit. Hence the name of the pattern, Drip Drip Drop.
This was one of those patterns that I had know intention of making, but as I saw others working it up in a knit-along I just had to try the cables, they were so pretty. I’ve not done a lot of cabling, so it was a bit of a challenge, but not as hard as I was afraid it would be. The lovely green yarn? A Socks that Rock Rare Gem from Blue Moon Fibre Arts.

After two solid socks I was in the mood for some crazy coloured yarn. I’ve had this Candy Sprinkles from Studioloo in my stash for the longest time. I’ve tried a couple of patterns with it over the years, and never loved what I got. I’ve done this spiral idea on crazy yarns before, it always seems to work, and it’s fun to do. I ganked it from Cat Bordhi’s Coriolis socks – I didn’t use her construction, just the spiral.

Twisty Sprinkles

There is one other pair of finished socks, but they require their own post, as I have quite a bit of info to go with them. Scrap lovers keep your eyes peeled for the next post!

Currently I have two pairs in the works. A cabled pair for my mom that uses a cable I made up:

Moms socks

The yarn is Indigodragonfly Merino Sock, colour Grr… Arf! (Mutant Wheaten)

And of course, I needed a new project for camp!

Caterpillar sock

Bright socks against the trees of Algonquin Park. The yarn is Wildfire Dreams, which doesn’t seem to be available any more. The socks are inspired by  Cookie A’s Lateral – I thought the ridges might be good for the wild variegation. I’m loving how they’re turning out, and the texture is very squishy!

That’s it for the sock round up!

Tune in next time for… uhhh… another sock!

Every year my LYS, Shall We Knit does something for Knit in Public Day (info for this year’s gala HERE). It’s always fun, there is always a fundraiser and there are quite frequently surprises.

This year they are raising money to help favourite dyers Indigodragonfly build a new dye studio.

And!

This year Joey’s House is one of the surprises. (MWAHAHAHAH!!!)

Kim, of Indigodragonfly has a bit of a thing with squirrels. So when I went in to Shall We Knit about a month ago and said “What’s up for WWKIP Day?” I was not too surprised by Karen’s request.

“We need squirrels.”

Of course you do.

However, they couldn’t be just any squirrels.

Obviously we need a Cute and Cuddly Courier Squirrel, and a Mutant Zombie Squirrel. Of Doom.

Cute and cuddly Courier Squirrel and Mutant Zombie Squirrel

How cute is this one with his little courier bag and wee skein of yarn?

Courier Squirrel

Ok, so Zombie Squirrel isn’t as cute, but he sure is fun to zombify. And he’ll guard your vegetable garden if you ask nicely.

Zombie Squirrel

Of course, the yarn is from Indigodragonfly – the Squirrels were knit in her MCN Sock in the colour People Are Particularly Stupid Today. I Cannot Speak To Any More of Them.

Which is why you need a Squirrel – so you don’t end up just muttering to yourself in a corner. Folks might get the wrong idea.

Zombie Squirrel’s red eye is from Closure Fine Fastenings, a wee little button shop located inside Shall We Knit. I promise, Lynn won’t look at you strangely if you ask for Zombie eye buttons.

For anyone able to make it to Shall We Knit they will be selling kits complete with the pattern, foam stuffing and eyes, andyou’ll be able to visit with not only the Squirrels tomorrow, but me too! Come by and say hi!

If you’re not in the area no worries!

The pattern is available now on Ravelry.

Happy squirrelling!

Alright, who out there, like me, has to make lunch for at least one kid to take to school everyday? Are you always looking out for something different? I swear Punky eats pretty much the same thing everyday. It doesn’t seem to bug her much, and it does make things easier for me in the mornings. Still, I like to make different things to put in when I can. Like many kids, Punky likes granola bars. But since our school is nut-free I can’t send most of them. And most of the bars that are nut-free are also covered in chocolate and full of squicky little marshmallows or candy or something. They’re really only one step away from being a candy bar (Yeah, Quaker I’m looking at you. Wholesome goodness my ass.)

Anyway.

So I am always on the lookout for a home made granola bar recipe – one without nuts. There are lots out there, but many use peanut butter as a binder and are so full of nuts that substituting everything out is beyond my comfort zone. But a couple of weeks ago I came across this recipe. No peanut butter, and only 2 kinds of nuts! This I felt I could make substitutions for and still have it come out recognizable as a granola bar. Check it out:

Nut Free Granola Bars

It worked!

I’m not going to reprint the whole recipe here, especially since Pioneer Woman has made such a lovely photo tutorial for you. But here’s what I did differently:

I cut the salt down to 1/2 tsp (if that). I didn’t think it needed the whole amount.
I added a big 1/2 tsp of cinnamon – more or less. I didn’t really measure.
I subbed apple sauce for the apple juice – worked fine.
This is Canada – I used maple syrup not molasses.
As a sub for the nuts I went really basic and used raisins and sunflower seeds. I didn’t really measure these either, but the amounts given for the nuts seemed skimpy for such a big pan of bars. Next time I’d put in even more.

These are the crunchy kind of granola bar. I think if you wanted chewy you could maybe bake them a bit less or cut back on some of the dry stuff. Also, if you need a gluten free bar you could do a gluten free cereal, and I’m sure there’s a good sub for the wheat germ – I think I’d just run some oatmeal through the food processor until it was sort of powdery like wheat germ and use that. Easy, and no hard to find ingredients. I’m not well versed on gluten free ingredients though – maybe someone has a better idea?

These were a hit with all of the kids and adults who tried them. It makes a big tray, I shared.

I love a good pattern collection, don’t you? So I’ve put my three $2.00 patterns all together in one place, at one low price! Come on over to Ravelry and get your $5.00 eBook now!

Introducing:

Less than a Latte: 3 sock patterns for the frugal knitter

Less than a Latte eBook

This book is a really good deal – three sock patterns for less than what you might normally spend on one! They are all fun, easy patterns – maybe just the thing to knit on vacation over the summer? Grab a skein of sock yarn (don’t tell me you don’t have any you big fibber), download the eBook and you are ready for some fine beach knitting! Or hey, Sunday is Mother’s day, right? Does your mom knit? Voila, instant present! No, she won’t think you’re cheap, don’t be silly, it’s your mom, she’ll be proud that you made a smart purchasing decision and aren’t going into debt to buy her something goofy.  If you have a bit of extra cash, toss in a gift card for her favourite coffee shop and a skein of sock yarn. What knitter mom doesn’t want some quiet knitting time with a nice latte? It’ll help make up for that time in high school.  You know the one.

 

ATTENTION KNITTERS! This eBook is only going to be available until July 31, 2013. Grab it now if you want it!

 

I like to use safety eyes on my knitted toys. I think they look good (better than my embroidery heh), they’re easy to install, and not too hard to get hold of.  Eyes are the most important part of the toy – your knitting may be perfect, your colours inspired, your making up flawless, but if you put those eyes on crooked or in the wrong place that’s all anyone will notice. When I’m ready to put a toy’s eyes on I stuff the head first, then stick the eyes through the knitting and then assess. I move them around. I fuss with them.  When I finally have it right then I finally take the stuffing back out and attach the backs to the eyes.

Now, my toys either stay here – and Punky is old enough not to try to eat them – or go to yarn shops as displays. Also not a big worry that someone will try to yank the eyes out.  But I am always concerned about people with little kids – those of the everything-in-the-mouth age.  Safety eyes are so called because when you attach them to a piece of sturdy fabric (I’m talking commercial fabric here, not hand knitting) they are pretty difficult to get off. I’ve never had one come off a knitted toy either, but I really think that a determined enough toddler could do it, given enough time.  Hand knitting stretches, and if you yanked on that eye enough and stretched out the knitting, I could see how it might maybe one day come out. However, my test knitter for Ciel, the wonderful Val has come up with a very easy solution to this problem. Take a look:

IMG_20130217_135304

 

Brilliant!  Just a little scrap of ribbon, with a couple of holes poked into it so the eye posts can go through. The grosgrain type of ribbon that Val used is nice and sturdy, and in a light enough colour not to show through the pink she used as for the head. Turn it right side out, add some stuffing and…

IMG_20130217_143225

 

Cute! A lady bug kind of Ciel! Thanks Val for sharing!

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